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The sky blue patch is an odd diamond shape edged in black. Along the bottom edge, against a gray background, are the black words "CLOSING FOR THE KILL." In the top corner, a red sun has four red sunbeams protruding outward. Inside the sun is the Roman numeral "XL." A camouflaged P-40 Warhawk with a tigershark mouth dominates. The aircraft fires six .50 caliber machine guns, and in the background a black enemy aircraft falls out of the sky, leaving a trail of black smoke.

The patch's four colors represent the Air Force Academy classes. The red sun and the "XL" link the present and future members of the 40th Squadron when it was called "ALI BABA AND THE FORTY THIEVES." The Warhawk links the squadron with the heritage and glory of the Air Force and the men who fought and died in the early years of air combat. Men who fought in P-40 were quick-thinking, fun-loving, dedicated, and courageous.

This second squadron patch replaced the "ALI BABA" one near the end of the '86-'87 academic year.
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The patch, shaped like a shield and outlined in black, has five white stars on a blue background in its upper portion. The nickname "ALL STARS" leaves blue contrails as it flares from the red and white vertical stripes of the lower portion. The blue numeral "38" sits to the upper left of the nickname.

The patch resembles the American flag and the Air Force shield and symbolizes the qualities of patriotism, courage and devotion to duty. "ALL STARS" is testimony to the excellence with which each squadron member performs his duties and responsibilities. The five stars stand for the five ideals of the squadron: character, discipline, devotion to duty, excellence and pride.

This second patch of the squadron was approved in 1972.
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The current patch is yet another in the evolution of the squadron's emblem and, technically, another color variation of the original. Its predominant color is royal blue, with gold bordering the circle. In the center, a gray knight with a blue shield, a red and white coronet, and a winged helmet is mounted on a large, gray and white stallion. The knight holds a silver, white and gray lance. A large, cratered, sliver moon and the red numeral "37" are in the upper right hand area. Gold is used for the knight's spur, the saddle girth and the horse's front hoof.

This variation, the third major color change, has been used since 1976.

It is possible to find examples of this patch without the red on the knight's coronet or headban.
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The patch, a turquoise circle bordered in black, dominantly portrays the "Grim Reaper." He has a gray and white skull and hands and wears a black cloak. He holds the gold Roman numeral "XXXI" by a chain in his right hand and a scythe in his left.

The "Grim Reaper" represents the reality of death and serves to remind cadets they have, as members of the Armed Forces, devoted their lives to their country. This dedication distinguishes the military profession from all others.

This second patch of the squadron was approved in 1972.
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The patch is a circle with a gold border. The top half of the background is blue with a white "34" in the upper tight. The lower half of the filed has alternating red and white stripes converging at the center of the patch. A gray A-10 Thunderbolt II with a P-47 Thunderbolt immediately below it dominates the center. A bolt of lightning, gold with a white border, extends from the upper left to the lower right. A gray and purple armored hand holds the bolt, and Polaris lies immediately below the hand.

The dominate colors represent the four classes at the Air Force Academy. Though both aircraft are nicknamed "Thunderbolt," the A-10 symbolizes the modern American Air Force while the P-47 serves as a reminder of its rich heritage. The thunderbolt shows the strength and power of the Air Force, and the arm poised to throw the thunderbolt serves as a warning to potential aggressors that America is ready and willing to use military might to maintain its freedom and society.

The thunderbolt patch, the squadron's third, was designed by Tracy M. Murakami, and approved for use in September 1981.
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The patch, bordered in dark green and white, is an emerald green with an aircraft and its contrails are in the center. The dark red inscription "Roadrunners" is at the top. The Roadrunners, a cartoon character, and the bright orange numeral "32" dominate the field. The squadron motto, "Catch Us If You Can," is on the bottom of the patch.

The Roadrunner represents the speed and craftiness, as he always cleverly evades numerous encounters with the infamous coyote. Consistent with the idea of speed and craft is the jet plane soaring to the top of the patch, symbolizing flight and the aspirations of new careers.

This is the squadron's original patch.
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The patch is a white circle outlined in gold. Two black falcons, diving in formation, leave blue contrails. The black numeral "33" is located in the patch's upper right portion.

The two spacecraft-like falcons represent the mascot of the Air Force Academy, the bird of prey noted for its speed, keen eyesight and fierce fighting spirit. They fly in formation to show the teamwork of the members of the cadet wing and the Air Force.

This is the squadron's original patch.
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The patch is royal blue circle with a black border. A white, brown and black weasel flies two white and black missiles. The weasel's eyes, mouth and gloves are bright red as is the Arabic numeral "35" on the left central position of the emblem. Groups of three and five gold stars are at the top left of the patch. The aggressive weasel holds a gold thunderbolt in the one gloved hand and a flight control stick in the other.

This patch continues the theme of its forerunner a tribute to the F-105 pilots who flew Wild Weasel on surface-to-air suppression missions in Vietnam. The lightning bolt signifies the speed of the Air Force strike capability. The weasel depicts the determination and skill of the Air Force aviator.

This third patch for the 35th Squadron was authorized on Sept. 29, 1983, after approval by General Dynamics Corporation, the manufacturer of the missiles.
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The patch has an irregular gold pentagon on a yellow-edged blue circle. A stylized SR-71, with a white "28" on it, is centered on the pentagon. Two black lines emanate from the nose of the aircraft and extend to the edges of the pentagon.

The pentagon represents the future Air Force leadership being developed at the Air Force Academy. The stylized SR-71 signifies the search for knowledge and the dedication to the pursuit of national goals. From this aircraft the 28th Squadron once derived its nickname, "Blackbirds." The color gold symbolizes the excellence demanded of Air Force officers.

This is the squadron's original patch. A variation may exist with a white scroll at the bottom of the patch.
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The central item of the patch is a fierce representation of a thunderbird on a black bordered triangular field of silver. The triangle sits on a blue, white-bordered, circular field. The thunderbird, bright yellow and outlined in royal blue, has three black concentric triangles superimposed on his chest. The numeral "27" is emblazoned on the bird's tail feathers, directly below the triangles.

The thunderbird, a symbol to the early native Americans inhabiting Colorado, ruled the skies. Since it could produce thunder, lightning and rain, the thunderbird represents the Air Force's dominance of the skies. The silver triangle is a stylized aircraft and the three concentric triangles represent three cubed, or twenty-seven. The patch contains the four academy colors to represent the unity of the wing.

This original patch of the squadron was designed by Donald S. Bowers, Jr., class of 1970.
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The patch is a circle with a knight's helmet, topped with a four-color plume, in the center. A stylized black and white aircraft leaves a contrail on a blue field to the helmet's left. To its right, the red numeral "30" sits amid red-highlighted yellow flames on a black field.

The knight's helmet represents the military profession--cadet's heritage. The four-colored plume symbolizes the four classes. The flames stand fro war, to which the helmet is impervious. The ascending aircraft on the left suggests freedom of the skies and a peaceful contrast to the flames of war.

This is the squadron's original patch. It may be found with variations in the blue colors.
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The patch depicts Snoopy wearing a gold World War I flying helmet and sitting on his sliver dog house atop a bright green hill. The large red numeral "26" is displayed on a blue sky above Snoopy. White clouds form above the numerals. "BARONS" is written in red letters at the bottom of the patch.

Charles Schulz' familiar comic strip character was chosen because of his doggedness in getting the job done--despite constant setback in his pursuit of the Red Baron. Snoopy continually comes back for more, setting a fine example for the cadets of the 26th. The patch also represents the Air Force's air power heritage and contains the four class colors.

This is the squadron's original patch. A variation may exist without the "BARONS" tab.
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The patch is a white circle with a gold border. The central figure, a black panther, crouches on the top horizontal bar of the red Roman numeral "XXIX."

The black panther represents the quick strength and cunning of the Air Force; its crouched stance is a reminder that the Air Force is always ready. The white background symbolizes the virtue and nobility of humankind. The red Roman numeral symbolizes the fact that war has existed since antiquity, and the mission of the Air Force is to defend the country.

This is the squadron's original patch.
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The patch depicts an eagle on a blue, inverted triangle with black borders. The black and white eagle, clutching a gold lightning bolt, soars above a white globe. A Polaris star, surrounded by two atomic rings, shines above the eagle. The gold numeral "24" is directly below.

The eagle symbolizes the virtues of strength, courage, and character each cadet strives to attain. The lightning bolt represents the global responsiveness of the Air Force. Polaris acts as a guiding light to cadets in their pursuit of knowledge. The atom symbolizes the predominant role of knowledge and technology in the modern Air Force.

This is the squadron's original patch.
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The circular patch shows two playing cards, the ace of spades on top of the jack of spades, centered on a green field. The white numerals "21" sit beneath the cards. The patch has a black boarder.

The ace and jack of spades form the winning combination of twenty-one in the card game, Black Jack, thus they note both the squadron's number and nickname. This winning hand symbolizes the ingredients of character necessary to attain success: skill, spirit, ability, and fellowship. The green background represents the combined colors of gold and blue, the colors of the two classes that were involved in the patch's design. This mixture provides the incentive for cooperation between classes.

Grant D. Callin, class of 1963, was the principal designer of the emblem.
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The patch is a circle containing a blue field bordered in gold. At the base of the circle is the squadron's number expressed in a red Roman numeral accented with black. A black cat with one red eye stands atop the numeral. Two fighters, flying in formation from right to left across the patch, execute a climbing turn and leave gold contrails.

The 25th Squadron is nicknamed after the Redeye missile; the black cat with a single red eye symbolizes this. "Redeye" typifies the unerring accuracy of the squadron in reaching its goals. The blue background symbolizes the sky. The two fighters in formation signify comradeship. The gold contrails left by the fighters indicate that this comradeship is long-lasting and follows cadets into the Air Force.

This is the squadron's original patch.
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