Sijan Hall dormitory to get upgrades

Workers at the U.S. Air Force Academy are preparing Sijan Hall,  a cadet dormitory, for a major six-phase renovation project. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Workers at the U.S. Air Force Academy are preparing Sijan Hall, a cadet dormitory, for a major six-phase renovation project. (U.S. Air Force photo)

U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. --

Sijan Hall, a cadet dormitory at Air Force Academy, is undergoing multiple system repairs as the Academy ramps-up to a full renovation of the facility in 2020.  

Those renovations are scheduled to occur in six phases, and include a complete re-roofing of the sixth floor of the building and projects required to provide cadets with the best accommodations available with current technology, said Col. Patrick Carley, vice commander of the 10th Air Base Wing.

"The 10th ABW places a high priority on addressing cadet mission needs and will continue to prioritize projects using that overall approach," he said.

 The interim projects underway in Sijan Hall include:

-- Replacing heat exchanges for uniform consistency and to correct hot water issues

-- Repairing pavers around the dorm to eliminate leaks below the terrazzo

-- Permanently repairing the corroded fire suppression system

-- Structural column repairs, including leakage repair and asbestos abatement

-- Minor bathroom repairs, including grout reduction and etc.

Carley said taking care of these structural needs will make the facility ready for the six major phases to come. 

"An Academy recapitalization effort in the 1990s', dubbed "FIX USAFA," made repairs and updates to Vandenberg Hall, concluding those facility renovations that captured the major issues of that time," he said. "Sijan Hall was not included in the effort then, and, in recent years, several facility systems have failed."

Also since then, the mission dependency index for multiple cadet area facilities was raised via an official process with Air Force Installation Mission Support Command and the Air Force Civil Engineering Center so that Academy projects would score higher against other bases, Carley said.