Air Force leaders overhaul Airmen performance reports

Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody answers a question from an Airman, via a video message, during his 2nd worldwide CHIEFchat Jan. 9, 2014, at Defense Media Activity, Fort Meade, Md. During this session of CHIEFchat, Cody addressed upcoming changes to enlisted performance reports and effects of force management. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jette Carr)

Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody answers a question from an Airman, via a video message, during his 2nd worldwide CHIEFchat Jan. 9, 2014, at Defense Media Activity, Fort Meade, Md. During this session of CHIEFchat, Cody addressed upcoming changes to enlisted performance reports and effects of force management. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jette Carr)

U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. -- Airmen will now be rated on how well they contribute to a healthy work environment as part of a revamped officer and enlisted rating system introduced by Air Force leaders in January.

According to an Air Force guidance memorandum governing the new officer and enlisted performance reports, "All Airmen are responsible for creating an organizational climate in which every member is treated with dignity and respect, and one that does not tolerate unlawful discrimination, sexual harassment, or sexual assault in any form."

Air Force Forms 707, Officer Performance Report; 910, Enlisted Performance Report; 911, Senior Enlisted Performance Report; and 932 and 931, Enlisted Performance Feedback Worksheets, now include segments assessing an Airman's influence and support of workplace fairness and equality.

"Producing a good working environment is an important step in producing a high performing team," said Chief Master Sgt. Stephen Ludwig, the Academy's command chief. "Giving and receiving climate-related feedback will only enhance the understanding of a unit's goals and objectives, as well as areas that might need improvement."

Adding climate-assessment factors to the performance reports is a positive change assessing Airmen, said Layla Hernandez, an Academy sexual assault program specialist.

"Climate assessments can be used as an awareness and prevention tool to enhance the knowledge, skill, and ability of Airman with regard to sexual assault," she said. "By being provided the information commanders receive through climate assessments, Airmen are given the opportunity to address sexual harassment and sexual assault issues in the workplace and can hold each other accountable. Awareness of a toxic climate is the first step in creating a culture that fosters a climate of respect and dignity."

The changes to the rating system were a specific part of the National Defense Authorization Act, legislation passed by Congress last year authorizing the budget authority of the Defense Department.