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USAFA helping-agency reps will bring their services to dorms

Scott Andrews, the executive director of the Academy's Community Action Information Board. (U.S. Air Force/Courtesy Photo)

Scott Andrews, the executive director of the Academy's Community Action Information Board. (U.S. Air Force/Courtesy Photo)

U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. -- U.S. Air Force Academy helping agencies will soon take up residence at the enlisted dormitories here on a scheduled rotation to continue meeting the spiritual, social, mental and physical needs of Airmen.

Representatives from various agencies including the 10th Medical Group's Behavioral Health Office, the 10th Force Support Squadron's Airman and Family Readiness Center, the Academy Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, 10th Air Base Wing Equal Opportunity Office, 10th Air Base Wing Chaplain Services, and Military Family Life Counselors will spend a few hours every week in each enlisted dormitory, said Scott Andrews, the executive director of the Academy's Community Action Information Board.

"We want Airmen to see these folks in a human, non-threatening way so when issues do come up, they will feel more comfortable reaching out to these agencies," he said.

The CAIB is a commander's tool used to assess the health of the community and enact positive programs and services to foster resiliency in Airmen and their families, Andrews said.

"It's built on a holistic and comprehensive Airman's fitness framework using mental, physical, social and spiritual pillars to develop a resilient Air Force culture," he said. "It identifies and resolves issues impacting Airmen, builds a strong sense of community, and enhances their ability to thrive in and successfully manage the demands of daily Air Force life."

Bringing these helping-agency representatives to the dorms will allow lower-ranking Airmen to interact with representatives in a relaxed environment, Andrews said.

"We didn't decide to do this as a response to any bad behavior or to try and watch people in the dorms; we just want airmen to know what services are available to them and help remove any stigma or fear that may be attached to reaching out to any of these experts," he said. It all comes down to caring for Airmen and their families - our most valuable resource."

Airmen can expect to see these representatives in the dormitories soon, said Paul Valenzuela, the dormitory manager.