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U.S. Army Lt. Col. Nathan Watanabe, a history professor at the Air Force Academy, shows an M1898 Krag-Jorgensen rifle to a class of Academy cadets April 19, 2015, at Fort Carson. The cadets took part in an Academy Historical Weapons Shoot and handled and fired 27 historic military firearms, including the 1766 Charleville Musket, the 5.56mm M16A4 Rifle and the M4 Carbine, to better understand the small arms used by the U.S. military throughout its history. (Lt. Col. Don Langley)
Cadets take part in historical weapons shoot
Bursts of rifle and musket fire were heard at Fort Carson's privately-owned weapons range April 18 when dozens of Air Force Academy cadets and faculty took part in the Academy's latest Historical Weapons Shoot.Cadets handled and fired 27 historic military arms, ranging from the 1766 Charleville musket, the M16A4 Rifle and the M4 carbine, to better
0 4/24
2015
Maj. Ueda teaches five classes at the Academy through the Military Personnel Exchange Program. (U.S. Air Force/ courtesy photo) Broadening horizons: Foreign officer shares rewards of Academy exchange
In 2001, Japan Air Self-Defense Force Maj. Kazuto Ueda, then a cadet at Japan's National Defense Academy, visited the Air Force Academy for a week.Never in his wildest dreams did he think he'd return here 12 years later to teach American cadets Japanese history, military and culture.Every year, the Air Force Academy and Japan's NDA exchange an
0 4/10
2015
U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Katherine Shaw, 633rd Comptroller Squadron budget analyst, will compete in her third IronMan race May 16, 2015. Shaw previously competed in one half and one full IronMan race and continues to compete to challenge and test her limits mentally and physically. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard/Released) Iron Airman seeks challenges to better herself
Then-Cadet Katherine Shaw's flight instructor sat across from Shaw with an expressionless face. The instructor took in a deep breath as if the air contained the right way to say the words he was about to utter, but there were none."They said I had a great attitude and work ethic, and would still make a great officer, just not as a pilot," said
0 4/10
2015
Senior Airman Katrina Alvarez prepares a vaccine for a basic cadet during in-processing June 27, 2013. Vaccines consist of dead or weakened forms of a virus that is injected into a patient to create a long-lasting immune response. Alvarez, now a staff sergeant, is a medical technician with the 10th Aeromedical Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Liz Copan) 1st 'Thoughts Out Loud' discussions focuses on vaccination
Vaccines may not come up for discussion all that much among Airmen: They're mandatory, so what's to discuss? But with the United States facing its worst measles outbreak in 25 years, more people are talking about getting vaccinated and why vaccines matter.Dr. Katherine Bates, an assistant professor with the Biology Department here, held a
0 3/25
2015
The dean of the Air Force Academy's Preparatory School, Lt. Col.  Alicia
Matteson (second from left), poses with her Combat Stress Control team
in Basra, Iraq, in 2010.  The Airmen are (from left to right)
then-Staff Sgt. Nekisha Liverpool, then-Tech. Sgt. Kimberley Rivera and
then-Staff Sgt. Anissa Miracle. (U.S. Air Force Academy/ Courtesy photo) 


Turning pain into power: USAFA Prep School dean shares passion on veteran care, combat experiences
When the first female Air Force Academy Preparatory School dean graduated from the Academy in 1995, she never imagined that as an Air Force psychologist, she'd one day be dodging mortars and sweeping for improvised explosive devices while deployed.After serving nearly 20 years, Lt. Col. Alicia Matteson said she knows the effects of war and believes
0 3/19
2015
The Air Garden at the U.S. Air Force Academy. (U.S. Air Force/Courtesy Photo) USAFA headquarters focuses on being mission-ready over inspection-ready
The Air Force Academy has been steady, over time, in its preparations for the upcoming Inspector General inspection. It's not just in time - it's on purpose."I think people in the Air Force are used to having to prepare for something," said Col. David Kuenzli, Academy inspector general. "It's a bit of a culture shift. Everyone wants to get up for
0 3/18
2015
Cadet 1st Class Jake Sortor. (Air Force photo) Finding mentorship: An Academy cadet speaks out
Editor's note: Cadet 1st Class Jake Sortor is a former cadet wing commander here. As a cadet, he's played on both the football and the baseball teams, as well as participated in Wings of Green and Wings of Blue, cadet jump programs. Public Affairs staff writer Airman 1st Class Rachel Hammes recently interviewed Sortor on the importance of
0 3/18
2015
The Consulate-General of Japan in Denver's official cook (right) prepares a meal at the Japanese Tomodachi Dinner here Feb. 24, 2015, hosted by the Academy's commandant of Cadets, Brig. Gen. Stephen Williams and his wife, Holly. 'Everyone is an ambassador': Academy hosts Japanese friendship dinner
The Air Force Academy's commandant of cadets, Brig. Gen. Stephen Williams, and his wife Holly, hosted a Japanese Tomodachi Dinner here Feb. 24 for the Consul General of Japan.Tomodachi translates to "friendship" and the dinners are traditional events in Japanese culture to promote relations among its citizens and international partners. The dinner
0 3/13
2015
Army veteran and wounded warrior Jacob Legendre poses with Academy-owned horse Stormin Wheat in 2011. Legendre said the Academy's Warrior Wellness program brought him hope and allowed him to focus on reason to keep moving forward. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Andrea Caudill) Horse power: Wounded warriors receive healing, support through Academy’s equine-assisted therapy
Just as service members come from all walks of life, so do the 30 Academy-owned horses which an Army veteran and wounded warrior said comforted him when he took part in the Warrior Wellness program here.Retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Legendre suffers from chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, deafness in one ear and a traumatic brain
0 3/12
2015
Tech. Sgt. Billy Gazzaway, assigned to the 21st Communications Squadron at Peterson Air Force Base, and wife Master Sgt. Emily Gazzaway, the Air Force Academy's senior enlisted aide, take a photograph with their son, John Kadin Gazzaway, in February 2006. Kadin died of leukemia May 2, 2006. The Gazzaways said Air Force mental health services helped them recover from their loss and encourage Airmen to take advantage of the support services available to them when they need help. (Courtesy photo) Taking care of Airmen: How Air Force mental health services helped a family recover
Two local NCOs have been on a journey of recovery since losing their son to leukemia nearly nine years ago, a journey they said couldn't have happened without the mental health services available to Airmen and their families.Master Sgt. Emily Gazzaway, the Air Force Academy's senior enlisted aide, and her husband, Tech. Sgt. Billy Gazzaway,
0 3/06
2015
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